Setting the record straight

So, many are offended by CNN’s news on Ghana and have written rebuttals that we don’t queue for food…
Let’s not pretend we don’t queue for our waakye, kooko, etc. We do queue, but not due to shortage. That is where we should set #CNN right; not return false reportage with false facts. We queue in the true spirit of democracy and rule of law. To report our queues as a manifestation of famine is where the fallacy lies. Starbucks does same, and it is not because there is shortage of food, or even coffee. It is merely a matter of choice. 

Ironically, Black Friday queues are probably the worse queues in the world, but what do I know😏.  
#CNNGetItRight #Ghana 

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Playing politics

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I still don’t understand this issue with these two Hons. Why would Hon. Tetteh call Hon. Andah a womanizer? Even if he is, how does it add to, or take from his competence? Okay, it would mean he is cheating on his wife, and perhaps be a question of his integrity… But it’s still a low blow of politics of “insults”, albeit indirect.

Now, for Hon. Andah, I’m not sure why he thinks bringing his wife is an apt response to the accusation of being a womanizer. So “womanizers” can’t have wives? Or he thinks a “womanizer’s” wife can’t stay at her “womanizing” husband’s side? So what if Hon. Tetteh’s husband is not by her side at her campaigns? What purpose did Mrs Andah, as spouse of the aspirant, serve at the campaign aside being shown to the crowd? What role would Hon. Tetteh’s husband serve at such a campaign? 

I thought elections were about policies. Granted that having a family is often seen as a sign of maturity in many societies, don’t we know, or at least see enough to understand that a lot of “irresponsible” people have families? That some of these “irresponsible” people have families who remain loyal to them and protect their public image? That many great leaders are or were either “womanizers”, polygynists, or morally not so upright? That many people may not have a spouse, not as a reflection of their own “irresponsibility”, but as a reflection of their courage not to settle for the mediocre just so society will confer on them a status of being a married person? That there is a nature-nurture war in the socialization process of offspring which means a child could have their own personalities independent of whatever upbringing parents might try to mould them into?

Really, this whole altercation is beneath two Hon. members of their calibre 😒

#Disappointed

George Andah was charitable with Hannah Tetteh – NPP

Latepost from Facebook, November 7, 2016

Playing politics

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I still don’t understand this issue with these two Hons. Why would Hon. Tetteh call Hon. Andah a womanizer? Even if he is, how does it add to, or take from his competence? Okay, it would mean he is cheating on his wife, and perhaps be a question of his integrity… But it’s still a low blow of politics of “insults”, albeit indirect.

Now, for Hon. Andah, I’m not sure why he thinks bringing his wife is an apt response to the accusation of being a womanizer. So “womanizers” can’t have wives? Or he thinks a “womanizer’s” wife can’t stay at her “womanizing” husband’s side? So what if Hon. Tetteh’s husband is not by her side at her campaigns? What purpose did Mrs Andah, as spouse of the aspirant, serve at the campaign aside being shown to the crowd? What role would Hon. Tetteh’s husband serve at such a campaign? 

I thought elections were about policies. Granted that having a family is often seen as a sign of maturity in many societies, don’t we know, or at least see enough to understand that a lot of “irresponsible” people have families? That some of these “irresponsible” people have families who remain loyal to them and protect their public image? That many great leaders are or were either “womanizers”, polygynists, or morally not so upright? That many people may not have a spouse, not as a reflection of their own “irresponsibility”, but as a reflection of their courage not to settle for the mediocre just so society will confer on them a status of being a married person? That there is a nature-nurture war in the socialization process of offspring which means a child could have their own personalities independent of whatever upbringing parents might try to mould them into?

Really, this whole altercation is beneath two Hon. members of their calibre 😒

#Disappointed

George Andah was charitable with Hannah Tetteh – NPP

Latepost from Facebook, November 7, 2016

What does it matter?

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Show Us Your Husband, NDC’s Parliamentary Candidate, George Anda Dares NDC’s Hannah Tetteh
I honestly don’t get the point this Hon. is trying to make by asking Hon. Tetteh to show her husband. What does having a husband have to do with running for office? Oh, I forget: it has a lot to do with it (#sarcasm#) as a woman can not be complete without a man. Well, he does show his wife too, perhaps as a sign of his own completion, but I find it rather insulting on the part of his wife being shown as a trophy. 

It appears though, at least from the comments underneath the post, that he was responding to something she (Hon. Tetteh) had said. I still don’t clearly see how it justifies this. However, for lack of context, (not knowing what he was responding to, or if the rest of the video indicates what he was driving at, or if the wife’s call onto the stage was for more than aesthetic value) I must withhold my comments for now…
Facebook Import, November 2016

The Cuddlist

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This Woman Gets Paid to Cuddle With White Men Who Have Never Touched…
My first impression of this headline was of a modern day voluntary Sara Baartman.

But after reading the content, I realize the significance of Amaku’s work in the discourse on consent culture and respecting boundaries in intimate relations… Quite enlightening…
Facebook Import, November, 2016

To whom it may concern, from the public transport 

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Dear person sitting next to me in the trotro,Just because I’m “skinny” -which I’m really not-, doesn’t mean you should bully me off my allotted buttocks space. And don’t give me that sneering side-eyed look. You want me to shift. I have “shaft”. Or you want me to shift out the window 😒.

Sincerely, and on behalf of all bullied asses in public vehicles, the “Petite” Girl.


Facebook import. October, 2016

Sex position

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So the man is talking about unhealthy habits, when he says “standing whiles having sex is bad”. I’m like “Here we go! Something new to demonize?”And then he continues… “The best way to have sex is to lie down. Don’t be on ur feet. Because when you discharge, oxygen rushes into/ out of (not sure) your head.”

🤔That does make sense. Something new to research… #SexStudies
Facebook Import. October 22, 2016

Last night I was a slut

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Last night I was a #slut!
It was evening, and I had stepped out of the house to buy something from the station not too far from home. I greeted the man and was about going my not so merry way, what with the rains rendering the dirt path slippery with all the clay in the soil. He stopped me in my tracks and asked to have a word with me. I wondered what it could be… I had had a few brief interractions with him on a number of occasions when I would greet him and he would ask how I was doing and send his regards to my mom; I don’t even know his name, and neither does my mom. He is just “the man on the way who is overly friendly” and often asks me what food I’m preparing for him…

But tonight he actually stopped me. He made his way towards me as I waited. And then he begun in Akan, “How are you?” I responded as typical of the “Ghanaian way”, “By the Grace of God”. He continued “The crab doesn’t give birth to a bird. You are just like your mother. I find you very beautiful.” Okay. “But there’s just one thing I don’t like about you”. Quizzical stare. “I want you to remove the thing on your leg”. “Could you tell me why?” “Oh, you go to church, right, and you know there are some things that block your chances of going to heaven.” “How does this ruin my relationship with my God?” “You know there’s one thing that separates us as Christians from the “worldly people?” He waits for an answer. “I’m not sure I follow” … From this point a series of incoherent words, and jumbled up references to Biblical scriptures, particularly to Jezebel. I ask for clarification. I’m not sure I follow. “Should I give you a scripture?” “I’m listening” When you go home, read …” He’s searching his brain for the scripture. “…read Hosea chapter 4…” He’s still searching for the scripture. He mumbles to himself, or to me. I’m not too certain which. He seems almost certain now “verse 20. Read around 4 verse 20.” “Okay” “And let me have the response” I’m not sure what response he means, but I say okay. We part ways. I take out my phone and type in “Hosea Chapter 4 verse 20” so I don’t forget. I will definitely read it. But I can’t help but wonder. Hosea!? Really? Where is that? Old Testament, right? Oh, well…

Later that night, I pick up my phone. I know of Jezebel, but I need to be certain. I go to Safari. I google “Jezebel”. Wikipedia is the lazy way to go, but it will do for the night. I read all of Wikipedia’s entry on the Biblical Jezebel. Oh, okay. I see. -Later, the next day, I would read on anklets, and Biblical references to anklets. And I would find that it is mentioned twice in the Bible, but not now.- After reading on Jezebel, I close the Safari app. Hosea chapter 4, I type into the KJV Bible app. I start to read. I slowly make it down and realize in no time that I’m done with the whole chapter 4. There is no 20…
#SlutShaming … Thoughts to follow 

Ghandi still stands- though now “blind”

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Mahatma Gandhi’s Statue at Legon Defaced

🤔 I’m still trying to remember the Akan proverb that expresses my thoughts on this issue. I think it has something to do with the Opanin who sits home and allows children do or eat something; I just can’t remember…

But, really, who didn’t see this coming when the school authorities have “refused to do anything” about the general public’s displeasure with the statue, particularly since several of such displeased public, including highly esteemed notaries of the University community took the trouble to draft a petition which was signed by quite a number of people, myself included. It was not as though the points raised in favour of taking down the statue was not well documented historically. And it still baffles me that an Institution like the University of Ghana would even allow the erection of such a statue. 

And what was the response of the professor?

“It will be most unnecessary, most uncalled for and not in the supreme interest of Ghanaians and we must know what serves our interest best. Some people in India wanted diplomatic relations to be broken in Ghana over the way we sometime back spited them, but caution prevailed and they kept their cool to show that they understand diplomacy and the ups and downs of international relations and today the relationship is a bit better and we look forward to it being better still.”

 Pulling down Gandhi’s statue unnecessary- Prof. Ocquaye

 The demands were unnecessary and might affect diplomatic relations between Ghana and China. Whatever happened to the implications on Ghana and our history, especially considering that Ghana has historically been linked to the fight against imperialism and the pan-African struggle. Okay, so this is a professor of Political Science and Law; point taken. He speaks from his standpoint, and there is, afterall, freedom of expression of thought as enshrined in the Constitution of the land. But Professor Adomako Ampofo and Dr Obadele Kambon (both of whom I’m proud to have been tutored by) are both experts in their fields too in issues of race, imperialism and African cultures, identities and human dignity.

If you’re worried about the implications of removing the statue, think of the implications of not removing the statue on Ghana’s relation with our past and our future as a nation, and as a race. What does it say to future generations? Racism does exist. Colonialism is not over, and imperialism still lauds its lighter skin over and above the darker pigment of the melanated people of the African race. We all know that all too well by now thanks to global news. But the statue reaffirms racist notions and echoes the words Ghandi professed that links us as a people (both nationally and racially) to him. It tells us as a people that we are indeed inferior due to the colour of our skin. It tells us we are as a people one degree removed from animals, and as such have no other personalities to idolize and immortalize even in our “highest” educational institution. It tells us that if there is someone to look up to, it should be this man who had a complete disregard for us. It tells us that the very words we are imbibed with in the spirit of patriotism: “…and help us to resist oppressors’ rule with all our will and might…” “…I promise to hold in high esteem…and I pledge myself in all things, to uphold and defend the good name of Ghana…” is just a bunch of hogwash. Because really, the toil of our fathers will mean nothing to the little “Uncle Ruckus-es” that will grow up hating the colour of their skin, with no pride and no esteem to uphold. 

So by all means, let’s keep the Ghandi statue since the pros far outweigh the cons. And in the meantime, it becomes evident that the sword may afterall be mightier than the pen, because over a thousand signatures means nothing and is but an unnecessary demand. So people will find their answers in little acts of violence – something I in no way support. So today Ghandi may be too blind to see the savagery he accused us of… tomorrow… Well…